Disc Golf Meets Rustic Architecture

The Broken Shed. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

These are photographs I took awhile back (and posted about) from a disc golf excursion to the North Georgia Canopy Tours with my husband the disc golfer, Ricky Nance.  I previously posted many of these photographs, but they were unedited… and I’m not sure I even posted all of these.  I found them more pleasing to the eye, and more meaningful, than when I left them unedited.  They didn’t scream at me like I had originally desired… that is, not until I finally purchased Lightroom.  I wanted them to read as structures that are frozen in time, existing in light and in darkness; that sit still upon this earth until somebody removes them from their site.  I think a lot about Robert Smithson, since I am an art history major and huge art history nerd, but I love his writings on site and non-site art.  I know I’m operating on a totally different photographic mission than Smithson, but there is something incredibly valuable in pausing for a moment to stop and view the world around us.  There is always something to create and gain from a site that we cannot bring home with us, except through photographs.  I am attracted to black and white photography for its nostalgic charm, but I love high contrast and try my best to play around with contrast and light every time I create a photographic composition. I guess you could say I was aiming for a nostalgic approach… but I also hoped the observer would wonder about this land and its history… the bloodlines that shed their sweat upon this earth at one time to run this farm.

Around the Bend. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

Wooden Patterns of Time. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

The Tired and the Rustic. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

A Trailer Rests. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

Black and White Verticals. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

These photographs are another testament (as most of the land in this world is) to imperialism and its effects upon the earth.  Sadly, most of these farms in our country were worked by slaves, whether we like to think about it or not.  And before that, Native Americans roamed these lands until European feet treaded upon this soil.  I’m not meaning to sound depressing, but I my hope is for these photographs to come across more like an expression this land’s history, which it has been captured and documented on this day at this time of day.  I had Sally Mann in my head as usual while editing and composing but, obviously, with a more contemporary eye.  I hope that parts of our land will continue to be preserved like this and recycled into something new… such as a zip-lining canopy tour site or disc golf course.

Worn. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

The Side of a Chicken Coup. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

We are WASTE-ing Away. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

The Chicken Coup Entrance. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

The Steel that Binds the Structure. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

Little Ole Outhouse on the Disc Golf Course. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

I want these photographs to seem beautiful and haunting, yet I want the ghost that follows you to linger in your mind as you view our fast-paced, contemporary world and society.  I love the photographs of worn, rustic, abandoned structures because I find them to be more beautiful with wear compared to newer constructions.  Here, in the US of A, I am often frustrated with our impulsive nature, greed and compulsive drive to bulldoze our history with newly erected developments.  It is refreshing to visit a land like England (or anywhere else in the world for that matter) that is filled with evidence of time and history.  I wish I knew more about this specific farm’s history… all I know is that a couple wanted to find an investor to create the canopy tours and, once they found one, they transformed this old farm into a disc golf course, trails, and a zip-lining course.  It’s a pretty amazing place and I cannot get over (still) that there is a disc golf hole, where you have to throw your disc through an old chicken coup.  I hope you enjoy these photographs and please feel free to leave comments. I love and appreciate feedback 🙂

The Boat That Once Flipped Over Onshore. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

When the Forgotten Becomes More Beautiful Than the Remembered. Polly Nance. PhotoShop digital photograph. 8 x 10 inches.

22 thoughts on “Disc Golf Meets Rustic Architecture

  1. GREAT use of textures throughout all these photos! Your really good at capturing these old, slightly decaying buildings and using the lighting to your advantage!
    P.S. Thanks for the like and the subscription! It’s very kind of you ^^

  2. I think you’ve caught the mood of abandonment really well – black and white is so good for that. But I am intrigued that as far as I can see there’s nothing of the new life that’s been breathed into this place. Not a criticism of your photos which work well on their own, but with the text you’ve whetted my appetite for the transformation.

    • Thank you so much and thank you for the great feedback… the place is pretty much untouched beyond the land being given a new purpose. But I love that these objects and structures still remain. Thanks for reading!

  3. Hey Polly, this photographs are fantastic, there are some textures i found delightfully —i really don’t know if this word exists actually—, obviously, yes, they’re nostalgic and pretty folkie, like the place was vanishing or, in the other hand, being engraved on some stone in memory.

    Great job… now i can say i didn’t know about something called “Disc Golf” until now, thanks for this technical approach for me.

    Mantén tus ojos tras la cámara.

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